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From our Social Worker Ms. Hess

Social Worker

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Teen Mental Health

Coping Skills

Arcadia High School Vaping and Marijuana Resource page:

    • Resources:
      • Vaping Resource Guide: As parents and caregivers, we want to do all that we can to protect our children from the negative effects that vaping can have on a young person’s developing brain. Whether a child has not yet tried vaping, has already begun to vape or vapes regularly, this guide can help you. We break down what vaping is, why it appeals to youth, what the health risks are and what you can do to protect young people from its harms
      • Talk with Your Teen About E-cigarettes: A Tip Sheet for Parents
      • How to talk to your teen about marijuana: From drugfree.gov. Between legalization, increased normalization in pop culture and new ways of using (edibles, vaporizers, concentrates), it’s becoming more and more complicated to know how to address marijuana use with your kids.
      • notMYkid: provides children and families with truly lifesaving programs, support, resources, and education. Our mission for the past two decades has been to empower and educate youth, families, and communities with the knowledge and courage to identify and prevent negative youth behavior.
      • Win This Year Podcast: From notMYkid, this podcast shares information, inspiration, and strategies for parents , guardians, mentors, and educators on the topics of substance use, suicide, bullying, internet safety, social media, body image, relationships, anxiety, self-injury, depression, and more. This podcast features conversations with experts in the field of mental health as well as individuals with significant professional and/or personal experience with our topics.
      • Truth Initiative: is America’s largest nonprofit public health organization dedicated to a future where tobacco and nicotine addiction are things of the past. 
    • What are the signs of Vaping??
      • Equipment: You may find devices that look like flash (USB) drives, e-liquid bottles, pods/ cartridges (that contain e-juice) or product packaging. Aside from leaf marijuana, gel jars that contain highly concentrated marijuana extract (dabs), small tools to scoop dabs and cartridges that contain THC oil or wax (a yellowish-brown substance) are signs of vaping marijuana.
      • Unexplained smells (fruit, mint, etc.): While the smell from vaping is faint, you may catch a whiff of a flavoring where there appears to be no other source. For example, if you smell bubble gum or chocolate cake, take note. It might be a flavored nicotine vaping product. Marijuana vapes can produce a skunk-like smell.
      • Increased thirst: Some of the chemicals used in e-juices dry out the mouth and nose. As a result, some kids drink more liquids, have nosebleeds and may show a desire for stronger flavors (when the mouth is dry, flavor perception is reduced).
      • Increased nosebleeds
      • Caffeine sensitivity/avoiding caffeine
      • Mood swings: Vaping nicotine may lead to anxiety, irritability, difficulty concentrating and loss of appetite. Vaping marijuana can result in bloodshot eyes, dry mouth and thirst, increased appetite and shifts in behavior and mood. Sometimes, there is a noticeable change in friends and a decrease in activities that were once enjoyed.
      • Physical side effects of vaping may include trouble breathing, headaches, cough, dizziness, sore throat, chest pain and allergic reactions such as itchiness or swelling of the lips. More severe effects include worsening of asthma symptoms, lung disease or failure and heart disease.
      • Unexplained handheld devices in their room, purse, backpack, or vehicle.
      • Unexplained batteries and chargers
  • How to recognize if your child is vaping marijuana: Vaping can be difficult to detect as there is no smoke, minimal odor (although you may catch a whiff) and the vapor produced dissipates rapidly. However, just like smoking, vaping marijuana can result in bloodshot eyes, dry mouth and thirst, increased appetite and shifts in behavior and mood. Sometimes, there is a noticeable change in friends and a decrease in activities that were once enjoyed. 

 

You may also find vaping paraphernalia such as devices that look like flash drives, gel jars that contain dabs, and pods or cartridges that contain THC oil. There’s a lot of high-tech-looking equipment that can accompany vaping, so if you’re not sure, it might be time to talk to your child about what you found.

  • Consequences (admin can do that): 

Research also shows that teens who use marijuana are twice as likely as adults to become addicted to it. Long-lasting or permanent effects on the developing adolescent brain due to marijuana use may include:

  • Difficulty with critical thinking skills like attention, problem solving and memory
    • Impaired reaction time and coordination, especially as it relates to driving
    • Decline in school performance
  • Increased risk of mental health issues including depression or anxiety and, in some cases, psychosis where there is a family history of it

 -How to quit

 

      • Several online and text-messaging programs are available to help teens and young adults quit vaping, and there are other digital platforms to help parents and other caregivers guide young people toward quitting. If a young person seems to be addicted to vaping, it is best to seek out the help and advice of their pediatrician. Physicians may choose to prescribe medications to address nicotine addiction, including nicotine replacement therapies or, for children aged 14 and older, Chantix (varenicline) or Wellbutrin (bupropion) to help control cravings. There currently are no medications available to treat youth who are addicted to marijuana vaping. Professional counseling is the best approach to treating marijuana addiction.
        • BecomeAnEX From Truth Initiative, this is a free, digital quit-smoking plan and online community of thousands of smokers and ex-smokers developed by Truth Initiative in collaboration with Mayo Clinic. It has helped more than 910,000 people develop the skills and confidence to successfully quit. 
        • This is Quitting From Truth Initiative, this is a free and anonymous text messaging program from Truth Initiative designed to help young people quit vaping. The first-of-its-kind quit program incorporates messages from other young people like them who have attempted to, or successfully quit, e-cigarettes. Our messages show the real side of quitting, both the good and the bad, to help young people feel motivated, inspired and supported throughout their quitting process. We also send young people evidence-based tips and strategies to quit and stay quit. This is Quitting is tailored based on age (within 13 to 24 years old) and product usage to give teens and young adults appropriate recommendations about quitting.
        • Smokefree Text for Teens: Quitting vaping can be easier when you have a plan. Find out what steps you can take to get ready to quit vaping from smokefree.gov
        • quitSTART app: The quitSTART app is a free smartphone app that helps you quit smoking with tailored tips, inspiration, and challenges. The quitSTART app is a product of Smokefree.gov, a smoking cessation resource created by the Tobacco Control Research Branch at the National Cancer Institute in collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and input from tobacco control professionals, smoking cessation experts, and ex-smokers.

 

 

          • Chat: Connect with a National Cancer Institute Live Help information specialist. Get immediate information and answers about quitting smoking. LiveHelp is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Eastern time. LiveHelp also is available in Spanish.
          • Phone 1-800-QUIT-NOW (800-784-8669): All states have quitlines with counselors who are trained specifically to help smokers quit. Call this number to connect directly to your state’s quitline. Hours of operation and services vary from state to state. 

 

 

  • What to do if your child is vaping: If your child vapes, try not to assume that it is just a phase or a “harmless rite of passage.” Vaping can be very addictive and most people do not just grow out of an addiction or become bored with it.   
    • Adolescent Substance Abuse Program ASAP IOP – intensive outpatient 602-434-0249
    • Community Bridges    https://communitybridgesaz.org/ - 877-931-9142  - addiction, detox, prevention
    • Pathway Program 877-921-4050 – Tempe AZ
    • Anaszi Foundation – Wilderness Program – 480-892-7403
    • Parc Place – Chanlder – Drug/Alcohol Rehab – 866-720-3784
    • Devereux – 480-443-5582 – Scottsdale, AZ
    • Family institute for Health and Recovery 602-249-6674 fihrbynum@gmail.com
    • PAL   Parents of addicted loved ones https://palgroup.org/
    • NotMyKid – notmykid.org
    • Aurora Behavioral Health   480.345.5420 – Inpatient Addiction Rehab/IOP
    • Banner Behavioral health 602-254-4357 Adolescent Intensive Outpatient mental health and substance abuse
    • Willow Springs Center Reno, Nevada   800-448-9454  - Residential Treatment
    • Drug Screening – TASC 602-254-7328
    • Drugfreeazkids.org – parent resources
    • How worried should I be? Vaping is serious and worthy of concern. Just about all vaping products contain nicotine, a highly addictive drug, and the negative health effects are broad and can be serious. The vast majority of people with nicotine addiction started using a nicotine product before age 21. Despite this, a recent survey of parents of middle and high school students found that 40% said that they were not at all concerned about their own child’s use of vaping products. If you believe your child has tried vaping or is vaping regularly, it is definitely an issue worth addressing.                                                                
    • Take a health approach If you discover that your teen is vaping, address it as you would any other risk to your child’s health. Try to resist the urge to lecture, yell or punish your child. It is important to keep the lines of communication open, show your child that you are concerned about their health and safety, and keep the discussion from dissolving into a useless standoff.                                        
    • Go easy on yourself: When it comes to vaping, parents are working against strong forces. This includes limited government regulation, clever advertising and marketing and young people’s natural tendency to try risky things. Kids of all backgrounds, and many who have never before used an addictive substance, have been lured into vaping. With patience, love and the right interventions, you can help your child quit and get back to living a healthy life.                              
    • Get help: It is important to think of youth vaping as a health rather than a discipline problem. It is very difficult to quit vaping, and youth are especially vulnerable to the addictive pull of nicotine. While some may be able to quit unaided, many young people who try to quit will experience withdrawal symptoms, including anxiety, irritability, difficulty concentrating and loss of appetite. Despite limited research (due to the fact that vaping is a relatively recent phenomenon), the most effective approach to helping a young person quit is through counseling, family and peer support. It’s also important to address potential underlying mental or emotional problems that might contribute to the desire to vape or use other addictive substances. 
    • SUSD Substance Abuse Referral List:

 

  • Vaping and Marijuana 

 

      • What you need to know: Just like nicotine vaping devices, marijuana vapes work by heating a liquid or oil that becomes a vapor the user inhales. Marijuana vaping devices often resemble vaping devices used for nicotine or other e-liquids. For example, PAX is a brand of marijuana vaporizers that closely resemble the popular JUUL devices. Those seeking to vape marijuana can also learn how to “hack” nicotine vapes to work with marijuana from countless YouTube videos and other online resources.
      • The Risks:  Research also shows that teens who use marijuana are twice as likely as adults to become addicted to it. Long-lasting or permanent effects on the developing adolescent brain due to marijuana use may include:

 

  • Difficulty with critical thinking skills like attention, problem solving and memory
      • Impaired reaction time and coordination, especially as it relates to driving
      • Decline in school performance
  • Increased risk of mental health issues including depression or anxiety and, in some cases, psychosis where there is a family history of it

 

Links:

Vaping Resource Guide: https://drugfree.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/What-You-Need-to-Know-and-How-to-Talk-to-Your-Kids-About-Vaping-Guide-Partnership-for-Drug-Free-Kids.pdf 

Talk with your Teen about Vaping: https://e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov/documents/SGR_ECig_ParentTipSheet_508.pdf 

Become an ex:https://truthinitiative.org/what-we-do/quit-smoking-tools

Ms. Hess
whess@susd.org
480.484.6330