Course Offerings

Am/AZ History
The aim of this course is to develop an appreciation of the social, cultural, political and economic heritage of our nation and Arizona. Included is an examination of America's emergence as a pluralistic and multi-dimensional society, democratic system and world power. Emphasis will be placed on the modern era coupled with appropriate comparisons to earlier historical periods.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 2410/2411 Honors: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Am/AZ Government
This course presents the development, principles and practice of American and Arizona government and politics. The course develops knowledge of the concepts of leadership, decision making, institutions, citizenship and ideologies necessary to understand the purpose and function of federal and state government. The course accentuates the importance of responsible citizenship.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 2511 Honors: n/a Credits: 0.5
       
Astronomy      
Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe that surrounds us. This course will introduce students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students will examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 9204  Honors: n/a Credits: 0.5
       
Criminology I      
In today’s world, crime and deviant behavior rank at or near the top of many people’s concerns. In this course, we will study the field of Criminology – the study of crime. We will look at possible explanations for crime from the standpoint of psychological, biological and sociological perspectives, explore the categories and social consequences of crime, and investigate how the criminal justice system handles not only criminals, but also their misdeeds. Why do some individuals commit crimes while others do not? What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why are different punishments given for the same crime? What factors help shape the criminal case process?
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 9205 Honors: n/a Credits: 0.5
       
Economics Free Enterprise
This course presents the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and macroeconomics with an emphasis on the theories that explain the operation of the free market and the formation of government economic policy. In addition to building the students' knowledge and comprehension of these concepts and their application in daily life, the course cultivates the students’ ability to evaluate and criticize the concepts and theories presented. The academic demands of this class are challenging.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 2510 Honors: n/a Credits: 0.5
       
Psychology (Intro. to)       
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the study of human behavior. Topics including personality theory, abnormal psychology, therapy, sensation and perception will be emphasized. Some controversial topics may be discussed.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 2628 Honors: n/a Credits: 0.5
       
Sociology I and II      
Sociology is the study of people, social life and society. By developing a “sociological imagination” students will be able to examine how society itself shapes human action and beliefs…and how, in turn, these factors re-shape society itself! Fascinating online videos journeys will not only inform students, but motivate them to seek still more knowledge on their own.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 9222/9223 Honors: n/a Credits: 0.5
       
World History/World Geography
Using a historical and geographic perspective, this course presents the social, political and economic history of the civilizations that developed in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas from ancient to contemporary times. Students study the chronology, context and interpretation of these developments and their impact on current events.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 2318/2319 Honors: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
English I      
English I is the beginning course for all students. Students will develop reading skills as they study literary genres. Students will deliver oral presentations, write narratives/stories and develop other writing skills. They will develop word processing skills while utilizing library and multimedia research resources.
Honors: The course has the same language arts objectives as English I. The course differs from English I in that it requires students to read and write with greater breadth and depth.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 3110/3111 Honors: 3112/3113 Credits: 1.0
       
English II      

English II continues the study of English for all students. Students will develop reading skills as they study world literature. They will write expository essays as well as formal communications, such as letters of application. Students will deliver oral reports that include multimedia resources.

Honors: The course has the same language arts objectives as English II. The course differs from English II in that it requires students to read and write with greater breadth and depth.

Prerequisites: English I Course Code: 3210/3211 Honors: 3212/3213 Credits: 1.0
       
English III      

English III continues the study of English for all students. Students will develop reading skills as they study American literature. The course will emphasize writing argumentative essays and literary analysis. Students will deliver oral reports, which may include multimedia resources.

Prerequisites: English II Course Code: 3310/3111 Honors: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
English IV      

English IV presents an overview of British literature. Works of representative authors from each of the major periods are studied. One of the course’s goals is to refine the students’ higher level thinking skills as they read and interpret various works of literary merit. Part of this course is devoted to honing writing skills, learning research techniques, and discovering how to gather and use print and non-print sources in writing a research paper. Other activities include writing assignments, vocabulary studies and oral presentations.

Prerequisites: English III Course Code: 3310/3111 Honors: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Algebra I      
This course is designed to introduce the skills, strategies, and vocabulary involved in algebraic problem solving. It includes algebra concepts, functions, probability, statistics, analysis of graphs and charts, number theory and connections to geometry. There will be an emphasis on skills, application of the concepts of algebra and building a strong foundation for continuing studies of mathematics. This course fulfills the college requirement in Algebra I.
Prerequisites: 7th grade math  Course Code: 410/4411 Honors: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Algebra II      
This course uses a problem solving approach to investigate and understand mathematical content as it relates to real world problems. It will include concepts of functions, absolute value and quadratic equations and inequalities. Students will use logical reasoning to clarify ideas and apply the concepts of discrete mathematics such as finite graphs, matrices, sequences and recurrence relations to problem situations. Students will make connections between geometry, algebra, statistics and probability. This course meets the college requirements for Algebra II multimedia resources.
Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra I  Course Code: 4220/4221 Honors: 4222/4223 Credits: 1.0
       
Financial Math – Personal and Family
This course walks students through the information needed to make the best decisions with money. Students learn the formulas used to determine account balances, monthly payments, total costs, and more. They examine budgeting, spending, saving, investment, and retirement. Students explore mortgages and other debt structures and how to make good decisions about borrowing money. This knowledge will propel students into the future with a good foundation on how to handle finances.
Prerequisites: Algebra I or equivalent  Course Code: 4576/4577   Credits: 1.0
       
Geometry      
This course includes communicating with the vocabulary and notation of Geometry, deductive reasoning, measurement,discrete math, problem solving and applications of geometric theorems and drawings and models to real world problems. The students will make connections between geometry, algebra, statistics and number theory.
Prerequisites: Algebra I or equivalent  Course Code: 4510/4511 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Integrated Math
This course reinforces existing algebra and geometry skills and explores concepts students will need to master in order to further their study of mathematics.
Prerequisites: Algebra I/Geometry  Course Code: 4570/4571 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Trigonometry Pre-Calculus
This course is for students whose next course in mathematics will be a college level calculus course. It is a study of functions and their graphs. The types of functions emphasized include polynomials, rational functions, piecewise and step functions, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential as well as parametric and polar functions. Students will analyze the behavior of functions as well as use functions to model real world phenomena. Students will be expected to use pencil and paper as well as a graphing calculator.
Prerequisites: Algebra I/II/Geometry  Course Code: 4530/4531 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Biology I      
The prime objectives in biology are that the students: (1) learn biological principles and theories; (2) be able to recognize the relationship of biology to themselves and the world around them; (3) appreciate all life and how to protect it; (4) be aware of major biological problems in the world today; (5) learn basic laboratory techniques; and (6) acquire an appreciation of advancements in science.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 5410/5411 Honors Course Code: 5412/5413 Credits: 1.0
       
Chemistry I      
This course is designed to expose the college-bound student to principles and applications of chemistry. Chemistry is a building block course; therefore, concept mastery is vital for continued success. The topics covered are measurement, matter, the atom, the periodic table, nomenclature, energy, bonding, reactions, the mole, acids and bases, biochemistry, gases and solution chemistry. Laboratory experiments comprise 20 to 50 percent of the students’ coursework.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 5510/5511 Honors Course Code: 5512/5513 Credits: 1.0
       
Earth Science      
This course is designed to appeal to both science and non-science oriented students. The course is centered on the study of the Earth – its history, its changes and its place in the universe. The course serves as an introduction to geology, oceanography, astronomy, environmental science and meteorology.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 5340/5341 Honors Course Code: 5342/5343 Credits: 1.0
       
Oceanographic and Marine Science     
Extensive lab work builds on prior studies in chemistry, biology, physics, geology, meteorology and ecology as science concepts that affect the marine environment. Marine law and careers are explored.
Prerequisites: Biology I Course Code: 5730/5731 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Physics I      
This course is designed to appeal to both the science and non-science oriented student. The program includes concepts of motion, forces, sound, light, relativity, electricity and radioactivity. The relationship to other sciences is discussed along with some of the history and philosophy of science. Extensive labwork and engineering-type projects are integral to the course.
Prerequisites: Algebra II Course Code: 5610/5611 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
French I      
The first year French language learner will experience a variety of techniques, procedures and activities to effectively communicate at a beginning level. Emphasis is placed on listening, speaking, reading and writing to facilitate communication in the target language. Vocabulary acquisition and a cultural overview will be integral components of the Level I coursework.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 6110/6111 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
French II      
The purpose of the course is to increase the student’s proficiency at listening, speaking, reading and writing the target language. At this level, new language structures and vocabulary are introduced while reinforcing what was presented in Level I. New insights to the culture are provided.
Prerequisites: French I Course Code: 6120/6121 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Latin I      
This beginning course builds a basic understanding of classical Latin by studying the language and the Roman civilization. The study of vocabulary and grammar leads to reading and writing Latin.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 6210/6211 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Latin II      
The purpose of the course is to increase the student’s proficiency at reading and writing Latin. The course content is based on life in ancient Rome, with activities that reinforce and broaden the grammar and vocabulary base.
Prerequisites: Latin I Course Code: 6220/6221 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
 
Latin III Honors
In Latin III, students expand the knowledge and skill acquired in the first two levels. The course presents new insights into grammar and structure. 
Prerequisites: Latin II   Honors Course Code: 6230/6231 Credits: 1.0
       
Mandarin Chinese I      
The first year Mandarin language learner will experience a variety of techniques, procedures and activities to effectively communicate at a beginning level. Emphasis is placed on listening, speaking, reading and writing to facilitate communication in the target language. Vocabulary acquisition and a cultural overview will be integral components of the Level I coursework.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 6302/6303 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Mandarin Chinese II      
This course is designed to increase the student’s proficiency and functionality in listening, speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese. After a thorough review of Mandarin Chinese I skills, students will be able to converse for longer periods with more advanced vocabulary and language structures. There will be additional focus on Chinese character writing,enhanced by thoughtful insights into the Chinese culture.
Prerequisites: Mandarin Chinese I Course Code: 6304/6305 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Mandarin Chinese III Honors     
This course is designed to increase the student’s proficiency and functionality in listening, speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese. After a thorough review of Mandarin Chinese II skills, students will be able to converse for longer periods with more advanced vocabulary and language structures. There will be much greater focus on the Chinese character writing than in the first two years. Students will also encounter literature beyond poetry in the form of selected short stories and children’s tales representing various regions. Chinese culture will continue to be explored with regional variations included.
Prerequisites: Mandarin Chinese I and II   Honors Course Code: 6306/6307 Credits: 1.0
       
Spanish I      
The first year Spanish language learner will experience a variety of techniques, procedures and activities to effectively communicate at a beginning level. Emphasis is placed on listening, speaking, reading and writing to facilitate communication in the target language. Vocabulary acquisition and a cultural overview will be integral components of the Level I coursework.
Prerequisites: None Course Code: 6010/6011 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Spanish II      
The purpose of the course is to increase the student’s proficiency at listening, speaking, reading and writing the target language. At this level, new language structures and vocabulary are introduced while reinforcing what was presented in Level I. New insights to the culture are provided.
Prerequisites: Spanish I Course Code: 6020/6021 Honors Course Code: n/a Credits: 1.0
       
Spanish III Honors      
Spanish III students are expected to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Oral proficiency and expansion of vocabulary are stressed. The course presents new insights into grammar and structure; writing skills become an increasingly important part of the program. Students are introduced to Spanish literature.
Prerequisites: Spanish I/II   Honors Course Code: 6030/6031 Credits: 1.0
       
AP American/Arizona History     
This Advanced Placement course presents the social, political and economic history of the United States at a college level of instruction. Students use primary and secondary sources as well as geography concepts to engage in a thorough study, analysis and evaluation of the chronology, context and interpretation of United States history. This course prepares students to pass the Advanced Placement Exam in United States History for college credit. The demands of this course are equivalent to those of an introductory college course. Students who complete this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam. The demands of this course are rigorous
Prerequisites: n/a   Course Code: 2412/2413 Credits: 1.0
       
AP American and Arizona Government  
This Advanced Placement course presents the development, principles and practice of American government politics at a college level. Students utilize the concepts of leadership, decision making, institutions, citizenship and ideologies to describe and analyze the function and operation of federal state government in preparation to earn college credit by passing the Advanced Placement American Government and Politics Exam. The demands of this course are equivalent to those of an introductory college course. Student who complete this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam. The demands of this course are rigorous.
Prerequisites: n/a   Course Code: 2513 Credits: 0.5
       
AP Biology II      
This is a college level course that emphasizes the course material outlined in the curriculum guide provided by the College Board. A variety of topics in biology are covered, in both lecture and laboratory, which are designed to give the student an experience and opportunity equivalent to that of a college undergraduate who takes the first and second semesters of entry level biology for majors. Students who complete this course are expected to take the appropriate Advanced Placement Exam.
Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I, & Algebra I Course Code: 5422/5423 Credits: 1.0
       
AP Calculus AB      
This course is a study of limits, continuity, the derivative and applications of the derivative including rates of change. The course also includes integral calculus including the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the definite integral and the solution to differential equations by separation variables. Students who complete this course are expected to take the appropriate Advanced Placement Exam.
Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-calculus or Trigonometry /Analytical Geometry Course Code: 4552/4553 Credits: 1.0
       
AP Calculus BC      
This course quickly reviews differential calculus and then covers all of the remaining topics in Calculus AB as well as slope fields and Euler’s method for solving differential equations, logistic growth, approximation of functions by infinite series and an introduction to vector calculus. Students who complete this course are expected to take the appropriate Advanced Placement Exam.
Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-calculus or Trigonometry /Analytical Geometry Course Code: 4554/4555 Credits: 1.0
 
AP Computer Science
This course is designed to provide students with a special interest in computers the opportunity to learn Java using Microsoft’s compiler. Students will learn to problem solve using a high-level computer language and exposure to the concepts of object-oriented programming. Activities will include creating, compiling, debugging and running object-oriented programs. Case studies will be utilized to allow the student to analyze and expand on existing source code as used in practical real-world situations. Students who complete this course are prepared to take the appropriate Advanced Placement Exam
Prerequisites: Algebra I and Algebra II Course Code: 4606/4607 Credits: 1.0
 
AP Language and Composition
AP Language is a two-semester elective or English Credit course designed to prepare sophomores, juniors and seniors for the Advanced Placement Language and Composition test. This course focuses on preparing students to read nonfiction texts with breadth and depth, while also preparing students to write with insight on nonfiction texts. Students will learn to write persuasive and argumentative essays that deal with contemporary American society and will learn to evaluate and write about other authors’ arguments. There is a strong emphasis on creative writing, because this type of writing, which requires strong voice and style, will help the students write more effective AP essays.
Prerequisites: English I & II Course Code: 3316/3317 Credits: 1.0
 
AP English IV Literature and Composition
English IV AP is designed to develop an understanding of the universality of human experience that is revealed through reading representative literature of several cultures. The course involves intense analysis of plays, novels, short stories, essays and poetry. This course is demanding and has the same writing and reading expectations as a university course. Students who complete this course are expected to take the appropriate Advanced Placement Exam.
Prerequisites: English I, II, & III Course Code: 3412/3413 Credits: 1.0
 
AP Environmental Science
Emphasis is placed on environmental and biological concepts used to understand ecological systems with specific references to problems caused by humans. This class is activity oriented and students can expect field and laboratory exercises for quantification of supporting principles. This is a college level course. Students completing this course are expected to take the appropriate Advanced Placement examination
Prerequisites: Algebra I and two-years of high school Science with lab. Course Code: 5710/5711 Credits: 1.0
 
AP Macroeconomics
The Advanced Placement Macroeconomics program pursues the understanding of macroeconomic measures, policy and theory as applied to the market, growth and international trade. The demands of this course are equivalent to those of an introductory college course. Students who complete this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam. The demands of this course are rigorous.
Prerequisites:   Course Code: 2500 Credits: 0.5
 
AP Psychology
AP Psychology will cover the theories of psychology and the studies of the brain, body, personality, relationships, socio-cultural influences on personalities and interaction of all factors which influence the development of personalities. Critical analysis of factors involved in the development of theories and research of topics relative to psychology will be included in the course. The demands of this course are equivalent to those of an introductory college course. Students who complete this course are expected to take the appropriate Advanced Placement Exam.
Prerequisites:   Course Code: 2622/2623 Credits: 1.0
 
AP Statistics
This college level statistics course follows the syllabus outlined by the College Board. Topics include data analysis, measures of central tendency, sampling and surveys, reliability and uses and misuses of statistics. This is a practical applications course, not a theory course. Calculators and computers will be used for simulation. Students who complete this course are expected to take the appropriate Advanced Placement Exam.
Prerequisites: Algebra II   Course Code: 4660/4661 Credits: 1.0
 
Agriscience (Intro to.)
Students will learn more about the development and maintenance of agriculture, animal systems, natural resources and other food sources. Students will also examine the relationship between agriculture and natural resources and the environment, health, politics and world trade.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8760   Credits: 0.5
 
Anthropology I
The aim of anthropology is to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of our past, present and future, and in addition address the problems humans face in biological, social and cultural life. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of humankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change. Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the anthropological world are just one of the powerful learning tools utilized in this course.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 9202   Credits: 0.5
 
Anthropology II
Anthropology has helped us better understand cultures around the world and through different time periods. This course continues the study of global cultures and the ways that humans have made sense of their world. We will examine some of the ways that cultures have understood and given meaning to different stages of life and death. The course will also examine the creation of art within cultures and examine how cultures evolve and change over time. Finally, we will apply the concepts and insights learned from the study of anthropology to several cultures found in the world today.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 9203   Credits: 0.5
 
Archaeology
George Santayana once said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” The field of archeology helps us to better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped to shape our modern world. This course focuses on these techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students will learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted, as well as how artifacts are located and preserved. Finally, students will learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8988   Credits: 0.5
 
Art History (Fine Arts Credit)
In this course, students will understand the political, cultural and religious changes throughout history that are depicted within art. This course is an opportunity for students to reflect on how art was and is used as a vehicle to communicate, depict political and religious propaganda, and serve as evidence of cultural shifts and changes. Students will be challenged to contemplate the connection between art and context through reflective writing assessments and DBAs. Students will build upon knowledge throughout the course and understand how art relates and communicated cultural change and evolution.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 6798   Credits: 0.5
 
Communication (Intro. to)
Students examine the communication process, including elements of listening and verbal and nonverbal communication. The course also explores how these communication elements operate between self, individuals and groups. Communication concepts and skills are explored through a variety of methods and activities.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8710   Credits: 0.5
 
Critical Thinking
In this course, students will practice critical thinking skills, learn test-taking strategies, time management, and organization skills. They will build verbal competencies, and sharpen their mathematics reasoning, while acquiring essential learning strategies.
Prerequisites: Algebra I Course Code: 2118   Credits: 0.5
 
Digital Photography (Fine Arts Credit)
The Digital Photography course focuses on the basics of photography, including building an understanding of aperture, shutter speed, lighting and composition. Students will be introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions. Students will use the basic techniques of composition and camera functions to build a portfolio of images and capture people, landscapes, close-ups and action photographs. Student must have use of a digital camera. NOTE: Due to the variation in media explored, students are encouraged to take all photography courses in sequence in the same platform (eLearning or brick/mortar) to be most successful.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 6950/6951   Credits: 1.0
 
Early Childhood Education (Intro. to)
This course provides the historical, theoretical, and developmental foundations for educating young children, with emphasis on creating inclusive environments and curricula for diverse children and their families. Topics include historical influences, program types, guidance strategies, professionalism, current trends and issues, and advocacy.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8692   Credits: 0.5
 
Fashion Design (Fine Arts Credit)
This course is only available via eLearning. Students explore what it is like to work in the fashion industry by exploring career possibilities and the background needed to pursue them.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 6956   Credits: 0.5
       
Finance (Intro. to)      

In this course, the student will gain an understanding of financial management, including terminology, financial statements, financial analysis, risk and return, and much more! The student will apply financial tools and understand how they impact financial decision making.

Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 6956   Credits: 0.5
 
Forensic Science I
This course focuses on some of the techniques and practices used by forensic scientists during a crime scene investigation (CSI). Starting with how clues and data are recorded and preserved, the student will follow evidence trails until the CSI goes to trial, examining how various elements of the crime scene are analyzed and processed.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8989   Credits: 0.5
 
Forensic Science II
This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and testing. Students will examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guide forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology and material analysis.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8993   Credits: 0.5
 
Hospitality & Tourism
This course will introduce students to the hospitality and tourism industry, including hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other areas. Student will learn about key hospitality issues, the development and management of tourist locations, event planning, marketing, and environmental issues related to leisure and travel.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 9208   Credits: 0.5
 
Interior Design (Fine Arts Credit)
Are you constantly redecorating your room? Get ready to try your hand at designing as you learn the basics of color and design then test your skills through hands-on projects.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 6957   Credits: 0.5
 
International Business
This course is designed to help students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilitiesneeded to live and work in a global marketplace. It takes a global view on business, investigating why and how companies go international and are more interconnected. The course further provides students a conceptual tool by which to understand how economic, social, cultural, political and legal factors influence both domestic and cross-border business.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8992   Credits: 0.5
 
Legal Studies (Intro. to)
Every purchase, lease, contract, marriage, divorce, arrest, crime or traffic violation places the citizen face-to-face with the law. Law & Order is designed to provide students with an understanding of their legal rights and responsibilities.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 9211   Credits: 0.5
       
Manufacturing (Intro. to)
This course explores the various types of manufacturing systems and processes used to create the products we buy every day. Students will also be introduced to the various career opportunities in the manufacturing industry including those for engineers, technicians and supervisors. As a culminating project, students will plan their own manufacturing process for a new product or invention.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8770   Credits: 0.5
 
Medical Assisting (Intro. to)
Students will explore the role of the medical assistant, including professionalism, duties, responsibilities and medical specialties. Included will be information on medical law, ethics, office management and compliance/regulatory issues affecting the role of the medical assistant.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8742   Credits: 0.5
 
Medical Terminology
Students explore medical terminology and its symbols and abbreviations, as well as the application of this new language in health care. They learn medical terms relating to body structure and function, and how to construct terms using word parts such as roots, suffixes, and prefixes.
Prerequisites: Biology Course Code: 9168   Credits: 0.5
 
Music Appreciation (Fine Arts Credit)
The purpose of this course is to extend the middle school humanities program into the high school with particular emphasis on developing greater scope and depth in the area of music. The student will develop greater understanding of the critical, historical and aesthetic contexts of music, as well as listening skills. This course is for the student who desires a high appreciation of music, who desires to fulfill half of the Fine Arts requirement through a non-performance course, or for the music student who desires to enrich his/her performance skills with a greater understanding of musical styles, musicians and composers, and the civilizations that created great musical works - from Gregorian chants to modern and contemporary music.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 6763   Credits: 0.5
 
Mythology & Folklore
Beginning with an overview of mythology and different kinds of folklore, students will journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle, and watch as clever monsters outwit those stronger than themselves. They will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore and see how these are still used to shape society today.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 9213   Credits: 0.5
 
Personal and Family Finance
This course introduces students to basic financial habits such as setting financial goals, budgeting and creating financial plans. Students will learn more about topics such as taxation, financial institutions, credit and money management. The course also addresses how occupations and educational choices can influence personal financial planning and how individuals can protect themselves from identity theft.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 9214   Credits: 0.5
 
Personal Psychology I and II
Enrich the quality of your life by learning to understand the actions of others! Topics include the studies of memory, intelligence, emotion, health, stress and personality. This course features exciting online psychology experiments involving the world.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 9215/9216   Credits: 1.0
 
Principals of Public Service
This course explores the many areas of public service including education, civil engineering, and social services. The specific skills needed to be successful in each area of public service will be discussed.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8772   Credits: 0.5
       
Public Speaking      

Students will learn the practice of effective public speaking, including how to analyze the speeches of others, build a strong argument, and speak with confidence and flair. By the end of this course, students will know exactly what makes a truly successful speech and will be able to put that knowledge to practical use.

Prerequisites: n/a  Course Code: 6964    Credits: 0.5
 
Physical Education (Intro. to)
This course is designed to provide the student in-depth and practical knowledge, development, and maintenance of health-related fitness components: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition. Class activities include development of individualized exercise training and high level aerobic sports. Field sports, racket sports, archery, golf, basketball, dance, bowling and swimming may be offered. Recreational activities, contract work, and individual study will supplement the program. Knowledge is gained in the physiological and physical aspects of movement.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 7450/7451   Credits: 1.0
 
Social Media (Intro. to)
In this course, you will learn the ins and outs of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+ and more. You will also discover other types of social media you may not have been aware of and how to use them for your benefit- personally, academically and eventually, professionally as well. If you thought social media platforms were just a place to keep track of friends and share personal photos, this course will show you how to use these resources In much more powerful ways.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 9128   Credits: 0.5
       
Reading for College Success      

Reading is a vital skill in the information age where we are constantly bombarded with a stream of information. Being able to determine and comprehend the main idea in this constant flow is imperative to success in both the academic world, and in the world of work.

Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 6962   Credits: 0.5
 
Sports and Entertainment Marketing
In this course, students have the opportunity to explore basic marketing principles and delve deeper into the multi-billion dollar sports and entertainment marketing industry. This course introduces fundamentals of the process behind the scenes of a major sporting event, such as the Super Bowl, or how to play a role in such an event.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8638   Credits: 0.5
       
Thinking and Learning Strategies    
Train your brain's thinking skills and get fit for academics! Through reading, writing, and math activities, students develop critical thinking skills and test-taking strategies. Students also gain reading, writing, organization, and study strategies--a powerful one-two punch for any student at any student at any level.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 6960   Credits: 0.5
       
Veterinary Science
As animals play an increasingly important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well-being. Taking a look at the pets that live in our homes, on our farms, and in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries, this course will examine some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases impact not only the animals around us, but at times…we humans as well!
Through veterinary medicine and science, the prevention and treatment of diseases and health issues is studied and applied.
Prerequisites: n/a Course Code: 8991   Credits: 0.5