Social Studies

  • AMERICAN AND ARIZONA HISTORY

    Using inquiry in history, high school students will explore a variety of peoples, events, and movements in United States history with a focus on inquiry into the evolution of American democratic principles, changes in society, economic and geographical development, and the emergence of the United States as a global power. The course will include content from the following historical eras: Revolution and a New Nation, nation building and sectionalism, Civil War and Reconstruction, emergence of modern America, Great Depression and World War II, postwar United States, and contemporary United States. Special attention should be paid to how Arizona and its diverse cultures and individuals contribute to United States history.

    AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (AP tests are not given through SOL and families will need to find a different school to administer the test, please research this early if you choose an AP class)

    Prerequisite: Sophomores may be considered for this course with site administration approval. NOTE: This is a weighted course. This course meets the high school graduation requirement for American and Arizona History. This course is an introductory college-level U.S. History course. Students cultivate their understanding of U.S. History from c.1491 CE to the present through analyzing historical sources and learning to make connections and craft historical arguments as they explore concepts like merican national identity; work, exchange, and technology; geography and the environment; migration and settlement; politics and power; America in the world; American and regional culture; and social structures. Students who complete this course are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. College Board has outlined the curricular requirements for this class.

     

    AMERICAN AND ARIZONA GOVERNMENT

    NOTE: This course meets the high school graduation requirement for American and Arizona Government. Using inquiry in civics, high school students will explore how to become active citizens. To become engaged citizens requires a knowledge of the history, principles, and foundations of our republic. A comprehensive study of civics can be approached from many angles and perspectives with a focus on inquiry. The course will include content from the following topics: foundations of government, structures and function of governments, institutions of national government, law making processes, media, interest groups, and political parties, media literacy, citizenship, civil liberties and civil rights, and public and foreign policy. The aim of this course is to effectively engage students in the inquiry process and to educate students about the roles and responsibilities of citizenship.

    AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (AP tests are not given through SOL and families will need to find a different school to administer the test, please research this early if you choose an AP class)

    NOTE: This is a weighted course. This course meets the high school graduation requirement for American and Arizona Government. This course is an introductory college-level course in United States government and politics. Students cultivate their understanding of United States government and politics through analysis of data and text-based sources as they explore topics like constitutionalism, liberty and order, civic participation in a representative democracy, competing policy-making interests, and methods of political analysis. Students who complete this course are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. College Board has outlined the curricular requirements for this class.

    ECONOMICS/FREE ENTERPRISE

     NOTE: This course meets the high school graduation requirement for Economics/Free Enterprise. Using inquiry in economics, high school students will explore the economic reasoning process to make informed decisions in a wide variety of contexts. Economics is grounded in knowledge about how people, institutions, and societies choose to use resources to meet their wants and needs. A comprehensive economics course will include content from the following topics: financial literacy/personal finance, economic reasoning, economic systems, exchange and markets, and national and global economy. The aim of this course is to effectively engage students in the inquiry process and to educate students about the economic decision making. This course includes instruction in financial literacy and personal financial management as required by Senate Bill 1184.

    AP MACROECONOMICS (AP tests are not given through SOL and families will need to find a different school to administer the test, please research this early if you choose an AP class)

     NOTE: This course meets the high school graduation requirement for Economics/Free Enterprise. This course is an introductory college-level macroeconomics course. Students cultivate their understanding of the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole by using principles and models to describe economic situations and predict and explain outcomes with graphs, charts, and data as they explore concepts like economic measurements, markets, macroeconomic models, and macroeconomic policies. Students who complete this course are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. College Board has outlined the curricular requirements for this class.

    WORLD HISTORY/WORLD GEOGRAPHY  

    NOTE: This course meets the high school graduation requirement for World History. Using inquiry in history, high school students will explore a variety of people, events and movements in world history with a focus on inquiry into the impact of social, geographic, political, and economic influences on historical events. A world history course should include the study of the people of Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe with a balanced approach to the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. The course will begin with the 15th century to allow for depth of content and connection to current issues and events. The course will include the following topics of study: world belief systems, interregional interactions, revolutions of thought, industrial revolution, political revolutions, global rise of nation-states, World War I through World War II, Holocaust and genocides, Cold War, global imperialism, and contemporary global issues. Students should be able to apply the lessons of world history to their lives as citizens of the United States and members of the world community